NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale Announces Appointment of Francie Bishop Good as Board Chair

NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale announces the appointment of Francie Bishop Good as Chair of its Board of Governors. She succeeds Dr. Stanley Goodman, who will continue to serve on the board’s executive committee.

An artist and leading advocate for the arts, Good has been a member of NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale’s Board of Governors for over 20 years, and served as Co-Chair of the collections committee. Good’s artwork has been exhibited nationally and internationally and she is represented by Mindy Solomon Gallery in Miami. She lives and works in Fort Lauderdale and New York, and is a longtime champion and supporter of women artists.

With her husband David Horvitz, Good established the Fort Lauderdale-based alternative arts space, Girls’ Club, with a mission of educating the public, nurturing careers of female artists and serving as a resource on the contributions of women to the field of contemporary art. She also co-founded the non-profit organization Funding Arts Broward (FAB!).

In 2018, Good and Horvitz filled a major gap in NSU Art Museum’s collection with their promised gift of 100 works by women and multicultural artists from their highly regarded collection. Artists include Cecily Brown, Tracey Emin, Teresita Fernandez, Ana Mendieta, Catherine Opie, Cindy Sherman, Lorna Simpson, Mickalene Thomas, Kara Walker and others.

“Francie is a visionary who understands the tremendous impact that the arts can have in our communities, said Bonnie Clearwater, director and chief curator, NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale. “She has been instrumental to our growth as a vibrant center of culture and education and has also helped advance Fort Lauderdale in the broader cultural landscape. With Francie’s commitment and leadership, we look forward to continuing to expand NSU Art Museum’s reach to new and diverse audiences.”

Good stated, “I am thrilled to take on this new role. Art has always been paramount in my life. It bridges gaps between cultures, elevates our humanity and applauds differences and uniqueness.  Museums are the platform to open our minds to accepting these differences.”

NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale has launched a $1 million capital campaign in Francie Bishop Good’s honor, a portion of which will be matched by the David and Francie Horvitz Family Foundation. The funds will further the Museum’s exhibition and education programs and community outreach.

For additional information, visit nsuartmuseum.org or call 954-525-5500. Follow the Museum on social media @nsuartmuseum.

 

Annual Stanley and Pearl Goodman Lecture on Latin American Art, Nov. 21

Teresa Arcq, a noted art historian and curator of the work of women Surrealists and Mexican modernism, will deliver NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale’s Annual Stanley and Pearl Goodman Lecture on Latin American Art on Thursday, November 21 at 6 PM. Her talk, titled Leonora Carrington in Mexico: The Mirror of the Marvelous, will examine the influence of Mexico on the work of the legendary Surrealist artist Leonora Carrington (1917 – 2011), an enigmatic figure whose paintings feature evocative dreamlike imagery and symbolism.

The lecture will be held in NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale’s Horvitz Auditorium. (One East Las Olas Blvd.) Admission is $10 for non-members and free for Museum members. For tickets, visit nsuartmuseum.org or call 954-262-0221.

The lecture is a corollary event to the exhibition  I Paint My Reality: Surrealism in Latin America, which is on view from November 17, 2019 through June 30, 2020.

Teresa Arcq was Chief Curator of the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico and Director of an International Art Investment Fund. As an independent curator, she has created and produced exhibitions in Mexico and abroad, such as In WonderlandThe Adventures of Women Surrealists in Mexico and the United States, an international project presented at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), The National Museum of Fine Arts in Quebec and The Modern Art Museum in Mexico. She is a frequent lecturer at museums, institutions and universities worldwide.

The November 21 lecture is presented in association with the Jewish Federation of Broward.

For additional information, visit nsuartmuseum.org or call 954-525-5500.

Follow the Museum @nsuartmuseum.org

Exhibitions and programs at NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale are made possible in part by a challenge grant from the David and Francie Horvitz Family Foundation. Funding is also provided by the City of Fort Lauderdale, AutoNation, Community Foundation of Broward, Funding Arts Broward, Broward County Board of County Commissioners as recommended by the Broward Cultural Council and Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention & Visitors Bureau, the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture. NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale is accredited by the American Association of Museums.

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NSU Art Museum hosted A Sense of Pride Symposium

Pictured L to R: Alex Fiahlo, Kia LaBeija, Dr. Requel Lopes, Roberto Juarez Photo by Downtown Photo

NSU Art Museum hosted “A Sense of Pride Symposium: Visual Activists and New Identities” on May 18. During this all-day event, the museum invited activists and curators to explore the role of LGBTQ+ art during America’s HIV/AIDS crisis, and to spotlight the role of queer artists by bringing attention to these issues through their work. The event is part of the museum’s A Sense of Pride Initiative which you can read more about below.

Museums and Communities News is our roundup of stories demonstrating the many ways AAMD member museums serve their communities.

AAMD Museums: We Want Your Stories! If you have a story you’d like us to consider for Museums & Communities News please contact Alison Wade.

 

October News and Events at NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale

NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale will present Happy!, a new exhibition of contemporary works produced by artists who aim to engage the viewer emotionally. As in life, sorrow and happiness are intertwined in their works. Happy! is organized by NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale and is curated by Bonnie Clearwater, the Museum’s director and chief curator, who states, “Many of these artists acknowledge that making art is an essential means for them to work out their own trauma and frustrations, and they suggest that art can provide viewers with a sense of well-being that will help them cope with life’s challenges.”

The exhibition will be on view at NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale from October 27, 2019 – July 5, 2020.  Click here to read more.

Art TALK: FRIENDSWITHYOU

Sunday, October 27, 2 PM

Continue celebrating the opening of Happy! at this talk by FriendsWithYou, the fine art collaborative comprised of

LA-based artists Samuel Borkson and Arturo Sandoval III, whose whimsical and immersive installations draw audiences into a magical world where the line between imagination and reality is blurred and whose recent projects include the playful stage characters on the set of Reggaeton superstar JBalvin’s recent tour and floats for Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Free with Museum admission. RSVP required.

Free First Thursdays Starry Nights, presented by AutoNation

Thursday, October 3

4 – 8 PM

Free admission

Enjoy NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale’s exhibitions, 2-for-1 drinks in the Museum Café and hands-on art project for all ages.

Bank of America Museums on Us

Saturday, October 5, 11a-5pm AND Sunday, October 6, Noon-5pm
Bank of America cardholders receive Free admission to the Museum.

Creativity Exploration: Knots and Knowledge  

Saturday, October 12, 2019

Noon -1:30 PM

$10 for members; $15 for non-members

Inspired by the sculpture of El-Salahi’s Meditation Tree, participants will create a personal tree sculpture embedding it with imagery of their life journey.

Creativity Exploration workshops promote the benefits of creative exploration and the mind to-body experience. In addition to producing a sense of well-being, sessions expand participants’ perceptions of forms, while increasing brain connectivity through visual and cognitive stimulation. The workshop is led by educator Lark Keeler, a specialist in mindfulness education.

Creativity Exploration is sponsored by the Charles P. Ferro Foundation.

Limited space. Advance reservations required. $10 museum members; $15 non-members.

Second Sunday Film Series: My Hero Brother

Sunday, October 13

1:30 PM Exhibition Tour / 2:30 PM Film Screening

Film: $9 for Museum members and John Knox Village residents; $11 non-members.

Film and exhibition tour:  Free for members and John Knox Village residents; $22 non-members

Join NSU Art Museum and David Posnack JCC for a Sunday afternoon of art and film.  My Hero Brother tells the remarkable and inspiring story of a group of young people with Down Syndrome who embark on a demanding trek through the Himalayas accompanied by their brothers and sisters.

Director- Johnathan Nir / Hebrew / English subtitles/ 78 Minutes

Fort Lauderdale Neighbor Day

Sunday, October 27

All Fort Lauderdale residents receive free admission to the Museum. For more information visit www.nsuartmuseum.org.

Come and View I Paint My Reality: Surrealism in Latin America at the NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale in November

Exhibition features works by Leonora Carrington, Frida Kahlo, Wifredo Lam,
Roberto Matta, Remedios Varo and others

NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale will present I Paint My Reality, a new exhibition examining the manifestation of Surrealism in Latin America. Drawn exclusively from NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale’s in-depth collection of Latin American art and promised gifts from the Stanley and Pearl Goodman collection, the exhibition features works by Leonora Carrington, Frida Kahlo, Wifredo Lam, Roberto Matta, Carlos Mérida, Wolfgang Paalen, Amelia Peláez, Rufino Tamayo, Joaquín Torres-García, Xul Solar and Remedios Varo, among others. It follows the flowering of the Surrealist movement in Latin America in the 1930s and examines its continued influence through today, including in South Florida, with works by Juan Abreu, José Bedia, Fernando Botero, Pablo Cano, William Cordova, Demi, Luis Gispert, Guillermo Kuitca, Julio Larraz, Ana Mendieta, Maria Martinez-Cañas, and Jorge Pantoja, among others. I Paint My Reality: Surrealism in Latin America will be on view November 17, 2019 through June 30, 2020 and is curated by NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale Director and Chief Curator Bonnie Clearwater.

The avant-garde Surrealist movement emerged in France in the wake of World War I and spread globally as artists and art works traveled, and ideas circulated through art journals and mass media. Dreams, psychoanalysis, automatism, and chance were among the methods the Surrealists used to tap into the subconscious and stimulate the imagination. The European Surrealists embraced their Latin American colleagues, who nevertheless expressed ambivalence about the movement. Mexican artist Frida Kahlo famously refuted being labeled as a Surrealist, stating that she never painted dreams, instead asserting, “I painted my own reality,” while Uruguayan Joaquin Torres-Garcia advocated for a modern art that was not beholden to the European modern art masters. Latin America’s complex history, magical landscapes, indigenous cultures, archeological sites, mythologies, migrations, and European and African religious traditions shaped these artists’ reality.

The rise of fascism in Europe in the 1930s as well as the Spanish Civil War and World War II shifted the focus of Surrealism to the United States and Latin America, where many of the European artists sought refuge. These artists’ proximity to each other promoted friendships that were especially fruitful during this period and in the post-war years. While many of the exiled European artists who lived in the United States during the war returned home afterwards, those in Latin America and in Mexico in particular, tended to remain there for the rest of their lives.

“The depth and high quality of NSU Art Museum’s Latin American collection made it possible for us to organize a comprehensive exhibition of Surrealism in Latin America drawn exclusively from our holdings,” notes Clearwater. “Fort Lauderdale collectors Stanley and Pearl Goodman assembled an extensive collection of approximately 100 works with the intention of donating it to the museum where it would be a source for multiple exhibitions exploring this rich period of art history.” Clearwater adds, “the museum’s substantial collection of contemporary Latin American art and art by South Florida artists makes it possible to follow the influence of Surrealism, magic realism, and art of the fantastic through today”

Among the exhibition highlights is Leonora Carrington’s masterpiece, Artes 110, 1942, painted the year that the British-born artist arrived in Mexico after fleeing Nazi occupied France where she had been living with her lover, Surrealist Max Ernst. Titled after the address of where she first lived in Mexico City, the painting represents the artist as a spirited young woman flying away from the crumbling old world towards a new land. “Carrington is just one of several women artists in the exhibition who actively contributed to the Surrealist movement in Latin America and whose reputations have soared in recent years.” Others include photographer Kati Horner, Frida Kahlo, Amelia Peláez, Alice Rahon, Bridget Bate Tichenor, and Remedios Varo, to name a few.

“At times it is difficult to distinguish reality from dreams in these works,” notes Clearwater. “The fiery, nightmarish landscapes by Mexican artist Gunther Gerzo, Austrian exile Wolfgang Paalen, and the Chilean Matta, for example, were based on volcanic eruptions in southwestern Mexico.” Another example is a painting by contemporary Argentinian artist Guillermo Kuitca depicting a traumatic childhood experience.

The exhibition also focuses on the catalytic role artists such as Matta played by connecting the European artists with those based in the United States and Latin America. In addition, it explores how Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Wifredo Lam, Ana Mendieta, and Xul Solar, among others, drew on ancient symbols and myths as well as indigenous cultures for their distinct imagery. Clearwater notes that Latin American Surrealism has had a significant impact on contemporary art in South Florida. “Echoes of this movement are evident in the work of South Florida artists, such as Luis Gispert’s photograph of a mysterious tower constructed of boom boxes that inexplicably occupies a domestic interior, Pablo Cano’s distinctive marionette assemblages, and Jorge Pantoja works that are drawn from Stanley Kubrick’s psychological thriller, The Shining.”

NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale is located at One East Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, FL. For information, visit nsuartmuseum.org or call 954-525-5500. Follow the Museum @nsuartmuseum.org

“Happy!” | NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale’s New Fall Exhibition | Opens October 27, 2019

Rob Pruitt, Us, 2013 Acrylic, enamel, and flocking on linen. Each (66): 74.93 cm x 59.69;
Courtesy of Rosa & Carlos de la Cruz, Key Biscayne, FL © Rob Pruitt

NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale will presents Happy!, a new exhibition of contemporary works produced by artists who aim to engage the viewer emotionally. As in life, sorrow and happiness are intertwined in their works. Happy! is organized by NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale and is curated by Bonnie Clearwater, the Museum’s director and chief curator, who states, “Many of these artists acknowledge that making art is an essential means for them to work out their own trauma and frustrations, and they suggest that art can provide viewers with a sense of well-being that will help them cope with life’s challenges.”

Happy! includes works by Gesner Abelard, Cory Arcangel, Eugene Brands, Francesco Clemente, Tracey Emin, Christina Forrer, FriendsWithYou, Félix González-Torres, Keith Haring, Asger Jorn, KAWS, Ragnar Kjartansson, Susan Te Kahurangi King, Jeff Koons, Takashi Murakami, Ernesto Neto, Yoko Ono, Jorge Pantoja, Enoc Perez, Esther Phillips, Fernand Pierre, Richard Prince, Rob Pruitt, Esther Phillips, Mark Rothko, Robert Saint-Brice, Kenny Scharf, Alake Shilling, Frances Trombly, Andy Warhol, and others. The exhibition will be on view at NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale from October 27, 2019 – July 5, 2020.

Happy! follows a multigenerational trajectory from the mid-twentieth century to today. Among the earliest works included are two paintings by Mark Rothko: The Party, 1938, depicting a children’s celebration, and an untitled 1956 abstract canvas. Rothko’s thoughts about the nature of emotions in art provide the underlying theme of the exhibition. In a lecture delivered in 1958 in New York, Rothko declared that he meant his paintings to encompass the full range of emotions, and that he introduced “wit and play” and “hope” into his work to make the “tragic concept” of the human condition “more endurable.”

Although the color combination of vivid red, blue and yellow in Rothko’s Untitled, 1956, is unusual for his classic paintings, the coloration is strikingly similar to Matisse’s Joy of Life (Le bonheur de vivre), 1905, which suggests Rothko was aiming to convey the joy of life in his painting. The Party, 1938, also includes the distinctive high-key red, blue, and yellow coloration of Untitled, 1956, further suggesting that Rothko associated this color combination with moments of joy.

“For many of these artists, art-making is a way to channel sadness, stress, depression, and trauma. Their acts of creation reward them with a sense of euphoria or hope,” notes Clearwater.  “Even when faced with a hopeless situation, they can usually find a creative solution.”

Cory Arcangel brings Rothko’s philosophical approach up to date by using wit and humor to denigrate technology for failing to deliver on its promise of progress. In his digital work Totally Fucked, 2003, Arcangel modified the video game Super Mario Bros. so the protagonist has no means for escape. In this video, which runs as an infinite loop, Mario is stuck for all eternity on a cube. Mario’s dilemma is at once pathetic yet cathartic to watch, as viewers find themselves empathizing with his predicament. “For Arcangel, the creation of this and other works provided a constructive means to address his own frustrations,” says Clearwater.

Among other artists who address the subject of hope are Miami artist Jorge Pantoja and British artist Tracey Emin. Pantoja celebrated his emergence from a long period of apathy, which had inhibited him from working, when he painted Over the Hills, 2018, in which his depiction of Spider-Man leaping into the void represents his own newfound excitement in jumping into what Pantoja calls “the friendly unknown.” Regarding Emin, Clearwater points out that “Emin has stated that she cannot work from happiness. Her early film Why I Never Became a Dancer, 1995, is a story of her triumph through art over personal trauma and humiliations.” The film ends with the artist alone in her studio, dancing like a whirling dervish to the disco beat of Sylvester’s “You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real).” In the final scene, the artist looks out at the audience with a broad smile, giving a wink and two thumbs up as a bird ascends to the sky.

The exhibition also looks at archetypal symbols of happiness such as the smile, the rainbow, and clouds. Rob Pruitt’s 132 Rothko-like color field paintings are inscribed with smile emojis, and Yoko Ono’s A Box of Smile opens to reflect the viewer’s smile in its mirror.

Andy Warhol’s 1966 installation Silver Clouds is literally the “silver lining” that promises better times.  Works by the art collective FriendsWithYou include a monumental floating rainbow and a major installation of their iconic character, Cloudy. FriendsWithYou describes the floating Cloudy as a symbol with the power to move the anxious viewer to a relaxed and joyous state by offering a positive message of happiness and connectivity.

Cartoon and manga characters and cuddly animals, often signifiers of childhood joy, also emphasize an upbeat outlook in the works of artists such as Keith Haring, Jeff Koons, Takashi Murakami, Kenny Scharf, Susan Te Kahurangi King, and Alake Shilling. KAWS’ bronze statue COMPANION (PASSING THROUGH), conversely transforms a universal pop icon of happiness, into his alter-ego COMPANION character to express his own feelings of mortification and remorse. Other artists use symbols of celebration, such as confetti, employed by Frances Trombly, and caviar, used by Enoc Perez, as emblems of transitory emotional states experienced before and after joyous occasions.

The power of music, dance, song, spirituality, sex, and psychedelic drugs are harnessed by several of the featured artists, including Tracey Emin, Keith Haring, Ragnar Kjartansson, Richard Prince, and Kenny Scharf, while the generous gesture of gift-giving and healing (acts that give both the artist and viewer pleasure) motivated Félix González-Torres and Ernesto Neto. Several of these artists recognize the importance of play as a biological necessity that leads to increased happiness. As Clearwater notes, “Warhol intended visitors to his Silver Clouds installations to interact with the buoyant helium-filled reflective pillows. As they walk through the space the pillows rise and fall, creating an atmosphere of blissful enjoyment.”

One section of the exhibition focuses on artists who reclaimed the joy of art-making that they experienced as children, eliminating the rules of art altogether so they could achieve a more immediate level of expression. These include several Cobra artists, such as Eugene Brand and Asger Jorn, whose works are drawn from NSU Art Museum’s extensive collection of this post-World War II art movement. Mark Rothko, who taught art to children from 1929 to 1952, and his contemporary, Esther Phillips, were formally trained in art, yet both chose to emulate the characteristics inherent in children’s art. Los Angeles artist Alake Shilling (born 1993, and the youngest artist in the exhibition) was inspired as a child by the work of Jeff Koons, Takashi Murakami and FriendsWithYou, and continues to tap her inner child in her paintings and sculptures.

Other artists in the exhibition imagine an existence in which sorrow and pain do not exist, including the representations of “Paradise before the Fall” by Haitian artists Gesner Abelard. “Infancy is another state of oblivion,” states Clearwater. “This brief period of bliss is humorously disrupted in Christina Forrer’s tapestry Baby, in which a disembodied arm plucks a pink cherub out of the ether. The baby’s contorted grimace expresses its awakening to the horrors and tribulations of the human condition.”

Presenting sponsors of the exhibition are Dr. David and Linda Frankel and David and Francie Horvitz Family Foundation. Additional support is provided by Funding Arts Broward.

NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale is located at One East Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, FL. For information, visit nsuartmuseum.org or call 954-525-5500.

Follow the Museum @nsuartmuseum.org

 

Remember to React Part II: Drawings and Prints from NSU Art Museum Collection

Installation view Remember to React II, Left to right works by Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, Nicole Eisenman. Photo: Steven Brooke

NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale presents Remember to React Part II, an exhibition comprised of over 50 works from its permanent collection by artists including Nicole Eisenman, Helen Frankenthaler, Quisqueya Henriquez, Lee Krasner, Frank León, Ana Mendieta, Wangechi Mutu, Jorge Pantoja, Raymond Pettibon, Nancy Spero, Andy Warhol, and the Guerilla Girls. On view from June 15 – September 29, 2019, it continues the theme of the institution’s 60th anniversary exhibition, Remember to React (on view through June 2020), with its emphasis on women artists, as well as works representative of the current
global art world. The exhibition is curated by Bonnie Clearwater, NSU Art Museum Director and Chief Curator.

Remember to React II also runs concurrently with the exhibition William J. Glackens: From Pencil to Paint, which is drawn exclusively from the museum’s permanent collection of this early American modernist’s work. “The focus on drawing and prints in both of these exhibitions further demonstrates the richness and depth of NSU Art Museum’s collection,” states Bonnie Clearwater.

Among the works featured in Remember to React Part II is Los Angeles-based artist Raymond Pettibon’s first video, Repeater Pencil, 2004, in which he animated his own drawings to create a non-linear narrative that suggests the dark side of the American dream. Pettibon’s drawings hark back to the heyday of twentieth-century American illustrators, including William Glackens, whose drawings are on view in the adjoining Glackens gallery. Nicole Eisenman’s monumental ink drawing, The Anxiety of Adolescent Boys Hanging onto the Last Moments of Their Innocence, 2001, is a satirical battle of the sexes that similarly displays a drawing style that recalls early twentieth-century popular illustrations for the masses.

Now through- September 29, 2019

To read more, click here.

NSU Art Museum to Host Creativity Exploration: Going With the Flow, July 13

Learn about the Japanese paper marbling technique called suminagashi, and make your own papers while mindfully “going with the flow.”

Creativity Exploration adult workshops promote the benefits of creative exploration and the mind-to-body experience. Studies have shown that 45 minutes of creative activity a day reduces stress and offers mental clarity and relaxation. In addition to producing a sense of well-being, sessions expand participants’ perceptions of forms, while increasing brain connectivity through visual and cognitive stimulation. The workshop is led by educator Lark Keeler, a specialist in mindfulness education.

Event Date: Saturday, July 13, Noon-1:30 p.m.

Creativity Exploration is sponsored by the Charles P. Ferro Foundation.

Limited space. Advance reservations required. $10 museum members; $15 non-members.

Fort Lauderdale Neighbor Day

NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale has designated the last Sunday of each month as “Fort Lauderdale Neighbor Day,” which provides free admission to Fort Lauderdale residents on the designated dates. Residents may visit the Museum free of charge on the monthly “Fort Lauderdale Neighbor Day” through the end of the year.

In addition to free Museum admission, Fort Lauderdale residents will receive a 10% discount on catalogs published by NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale and sold in the Museum Store.

Venue: NSU Art Museum

One East Las Olas Boulevard

Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 United States + Google Map

For free admission, residents will need to show a photo ID, driver’s license, or residential utility bill that lists a Fort Lauderdale address.

NSU Art Museum Participating in Blue Star Museum and Partnership with Brightline

NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale supports the Armed Forces by participating in the Blue Star Museum program. Now through Labor Day, all active duty personnel and their families can enjoy FREE admission with military ID.

Special Offer/ Brightline Partnership

Ride Brightline. Code NSUMUSA 25% off. Gobrightline.com

Not A Museum Member? click here to Join or renew today!

Museum Hours

Tuesday- Saturday: 11 a.m.-5 p.m.| Sunday: Noon-5 p.m.| Monday: Closed

Children 12 and under are always free

Open until 8 p.m. every first Thursday of the month. (excluding July, 2019)

Connect with us @nsuartmuseum

nsuartmuseum.org | 954-525-5500

One East  Las Olas Boulevard, Fort Lauderdale, Fl 33301

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